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英语习语:高级--LESSON 37

编辑:share 来源: 美联出国考试 发布时间:2016-08-11

文章摘要: to throw (someone) a curve : to introduce an unexpected topic, causing embarrassment (S) ◆The first week of class was going very well until a student threw the teacher a curve by suggesting that the textbook was too difficult. ◆The director asked

to throw (someone) a curve: to introduce an unexpected topic, causing embarrassment (S)

◆The first week of class was going very well until a student threw the teacher a curve by suggesting that the textbook was too difficult.

◆The director asked us in advance to stick to the meeting agenda and not to throw him any curves.

to make waves: to create a disturbance, usually by complaining

This idiom is similar in meaning to the previous idiom, but the emphasis is on the aspect of complaining rather than causing embarrassment.

◆In most companies, an employee who makes waves is not appreciated.

◆The meeting was going smoothly until one of the participants made waves about the newly revised compensation package.

to carry on: to continue as before; to conduct, to engage in; to behave in an immature manner

◆Even in the face of disaster, the inhabitants carried on as though nothing had happened.

◆The business associates decided to carry on their discussion in the hotel bar instead of the conference room.

◆I can't believe that John carried on so much just because his dog died. He looked depressed and cried for weeks after it happened.

not on your life: absolutely not (also: no way)

This idiom is used as a kind of exclamation by itself.

◆You're asking me to invest in that poorly rated company just because you know the son of the president? Not on your life!

◆When a friend tried to get Mark to jump out of a plane with a parachute, he immediately responded, "No way!"

to cover ground: to be extensive, to discuss much material

Forms such as a lot of, too much, too little are used before the noun ground.

◆That national commission's report on urban ghettos covers a lot of ground. Many of the recommendations are too costly to implement.

◆In his first lecture on Greek philosophers, I thought that our professor covered too little ground.

to mind the store: to be responsible for an office while others are gone

◆It seems that all of our employees are taking a lunch break at the same time. I wonder who's minding the store.

◆Lynne agreed to mind the store while the others went outside to watch the parade passing by.

to throw the book at: to punish with full penalty, to be harsh on

◆Because the criminal was a repeat offender, the judge threw the book at him with heavy fines and a long prison term.

◆My boss threw the book at me when he discovered that I had been using company time for personal business. I was severely reprimanded and forced to make up the lost time.

to put one's foot in: to say or do the wrong thing

This idiom is used with the noun phrase one's mouth or the pronoun it.

◆Fred really put his foot in his mouth when he called his supervisor by the wrong name.

◆I really put my foot in it when I forgot my girlfriend's birthday and didn't buy her anything. She almost lost her cool.

to be up for grabs: to become available to others

this idiom is used when something is highly desirable to many other people.

◆When one of the full-time contract instructors stepped down, her nice office overlooking the river was up for grabs.

◆Did you know that Senator Stone is retiring and that her Senate seat is up for grabs?

to show off: to display one's ability in order to attract attention (S); to let others see, to expose to public view (S)

This idiom can form the noun showoff for the first definition.

◆Elizabeth is an excellent swimmer, but I don't like the way she shows off in front of everyone. It's very obvious that she enjoys being a showoff.

◆Jacquie showed her large wedding ring off to all her friends.

to learn the ropes: to become familiar with routine procedures at work or school

◆The job applicant didn't have much previous experience or knowledge, but she seemed intelligent enough to learn the ropes quickly.

◆It took the new schoolteacher a year to learn the ropes regarding administrative and curricular matters.

to keep one's fingers crossed: to hope to have good results, to hope that nothing bad will happen

This idiom reflects the way people cross their fingers to hope for good luck.

◆Let's keep our fingers crossed that we got passing grades on that college entrance exam.

◆Jerry kept his fingers crossed that the good weather would hold up for the picnic he was planning for the coming weekend.

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